Outer Planet Detective-Mysteries Vol 02 PDF
Detective-Mysteries don't just occur on Planet Earth. Crimes occur wherever humanity winds up. And there's someone there to write the story. Of course, it's been placed into the far future or alternate reality. Just so it's easier to read and enjoy. This second volume has been collected from newly-discovered early SF detective-mystery stories - just for you to read in all your copious spare time. ...

S. H. Marpel - Outer Planet Detective-Mysteries Vol 02

Outer Planet Detective-Mysteries Vol 02

S. H. Marpel, Various

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StreetLib eBooks

Language
English
Format
epub
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Description

Detective-Mysteries don't just occur on Planet Earth.
Crimes occur wherever humanity winds up. And there's someone there to write the story. Of course, it's been placed into the far future or alternate reality. Just so it's easier to read and enjoy.
This second volume has been collected from newly-discovered early SF detective-mystery stories - just for you to read in all your copious spare time. Short stories and novellas all. From planets and spaceways neither you nor their author will ever visit - except in your own imagination.
Because you deserve to have some light mysteries as entertainment these days.

Space Opera is a subgenre of science fiction that emphasizes space warfare, melodramatic adventure, interplanetary battles, chivalric romance, and risk-taking. Set mainly or entirely in outer space, it usually involves conflict between opponents possessing advanced abilities, futuristic weapons, and other sophisticated technology.
The term has no relation to music, as in a traditional opera, but is instead a play on the terms "soap opera", a melodramatic television series, and "horse opera", which was coined during the 1930s to indicate a formulaic Western movie. Space operas emerged in the 1930s and continue to be produced in literature, film, comics, television, and video games.

The Golden Age of Pulp Magazine Fiction derives from pulp magazines (often referred to as "the pulps") as they were inexpensive fiction magazines that were published from 1896 to the late 1950s. The term pulp derives from the cheap wood pulp paper on which the magazines were printed. In contrast, magazines printed on higher-quality paper were called "glossies" or "slicks".
The pulps gave rise to the term pulp fiction. Pulps were the successors to the penny dreadfuls, dime novels, and short-fiction magazines of the 19th century. Although many writers wrote for pulps, the magazines were proving grounds for those authors like Robert Heinlein, Louis LaMour, "Max Brand", Ray Bradbury, Philip K. Dick, and many others. The best writers moved onto longer fiction required by paperback publishers. Many of these authors have never been out of print, even long after their passing.   

Anthology containing:

The Polite People of Pudibundia by R. A. Lafferty
The Man Who Flew by Charles D. Cunningham
Asteroid Justice by V. E. Thiessen
Cronus of the D. F. C. by Jr. Lloyd Biggle
The Moons of Mars by Dean Evans
Asteroid of the Damned by Frederik Pohl & Dirk Wylie
4-1/2B, Eros by Malcolm Jameson
Sordman the Protector by Tom Purdom
S.O.S. Aphrodite! by Stanley Mullen
The Undetected by George O. Smith
War-Gods of the Void by Henry Kuttner
Earth is Missing! by Carl Selwyn
Nor Iron Bars a Cage.... by Randall Garrett
Twelve Times Zero by Howard Browne

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